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Learning Corner

Try your hand at our Quiz! Select an answer to the 15 questions below and press "Submit" to see how you have done!

As well, be sure to read the basic and advanced questions relating to various transportation issues. Great for discussion!

Wheat Marketing at Milford, Manitoba
Wheat Marketing at Milford, Manitoba
Magnacca Research Centre, Daly House Museum, Brandon, Manitoba, P86-338-2.

1. In what period did the bulk movement of grain replace movement in sacks?

Before 1850 1870-1880s
1850-1860s After 1890

Road Building
Road Building
Saskatchewan Archives Board

2. What was the significance of road building from 1919 to 1939 for grain farmers?
Provide farmers with off-farm paid employment Provide an alternative to rail for grain movement
Facilitate grain movement to local elevators All of the above

Farmers Delivering to the Elevator
Farmers Delivering to the Elevator
Archives of Manitoba, Canadian Pacific Railway, 32.

3. What was the standard capacity of the country elevator before WW I ?
15,000 bushels 35,000 bushels
25,000 bushels Over 35,000 bushels

Canadian Northern Train at an Elevator, 1910
Canadian Northern Train at an Elevator, 1910
Archives of Manitoba, Transportation, Railway.

4. Why was the Canadian Northern Railway called the "farmer's friend"?
Good service It brought an end to the CPR monopoly
Lower freight rate than offered by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) All of the above

Stopping House
Stopping House
Magnacca Research Centre, Daly House Museum, Brandon, Manitoba, P86-23-176. Reprint from E. McPhail Collection.

5. What was the average maximum distance that could be travelled in one day to a grain delivery point?
9 miles 20 miles
14 miles None of the above

Steam Threshing, 1887
Steam Threshing, 1887
Archives of Manitoba, Acker, Victor, 12.Photo by William Notman and Son, 1887.

6. What contributed to dramatic increases in the production of grain between 1877 and 1887?
New machinery and seed varieties suited to the climate Herd laws
Increased use of horses All of the above

Loading Platform
Loading Platform
Archives of Manitoba, St. Lazare, 5.

7. What was a loading platform?
A right granted by the Manitoba Grain Act A loading approach that slowed railcar cycle times
A point for farmer loading of box cars All of the above

Tester
Tester
Saskatchewan Archives Board, Regina, R-A2062.

8. In this photograph the grain is being tested for:
Moisture content Cleanliness
Weight Protein Content

Farmers in Politics
Farmers in Politics
Archives of Manitoba, Advertising, 48.

9. What moved farmers to take political action on transportation and agricultural issues in the 1920s?
Railways not allocating cars for loading by producers A tariff policy making implement imports too costly thus favouring Canada's manufacturers and railways
Farmer perception that they were "pygmies" fighting exploiting railway and other corporate giants All of the above

Lined up for Relief Supplies
Lined up for Relief Supplies
Saskatchewan Archives Board, Regina, R-B7834. Dree Photo.

10. Why were grain farmers suffering economically in the 1930s?
Drought & grasshoppers International economic crisis after the stock market crash in 1929
Government policies All of the above plus a lack of supplementary off-farm employment

Winnipeg Grain Exchange, 1938
Winnipeg Grain Exchange, 1938
Photo courtesy of the Canadian Wheat Board, Winnipeg. The photo is located at the Western Canada Pictorial Index in Winnipeg, Manitoba Cooperator Collection.

11. When did the Canadian Wheat Board get a monopoly over wheat sales?
1935 1943
1938 1950

Country Elevator and Steam Locomotive
Country Elevator and Steam Locomotive
Photo provided courtesy of the Canadian Wheat Board.

12. What challenges did Canadian railways face after WW II that affected the future of their grain handling network?
The need for costly track and equipment upgrades Increasing competition from trucks
Too much track All of the above plus strikes and inflation

High Through Put Elevator and Office
High Through Put Elevator and Office
Manitoba Agricultural Museum Photo, 2003.

13. Which of the following descriptions would not accurately describe a high throughput elevator?
Modern Designed to handle ten times the amount of grain they can store
Able to handle up to 3,000 metric tonnes of grain Able to service unit trains of over 100 hopper cars

Global Grain Markets
Global Grain Markets
University of Saskatchewan Archives, Saskatchewan Wheat Pool Fonds.

14. Which of the following countries is not currently a major export market for grain? (Do not be fooled by this 1963 map!)
United Kingdom Australia
Japan China

The modern Seaway in operation
The modern Seaway in operation

15. What marine transportation issue does not currently need to be addressed?
The level of user charges Right-sizing and financing marine infrastructure
Safety & security Government ownership & control



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